vintagenatgeographic:

Granite Park Chalet lies against the western wall of the Great Divide, Canada
National Geographic | October 1979

vintagenatgeographic:

Granite Park Chalet lies against the western wall of the Great Divide, Canada

National Geographic | October 1979

(via m-o-o-n-w-h-i-s-p-e-r)

elkke:

Iceberg and glass-fiber boat support riders on mile-high Berg Lake.
National Geographic, April 1964

elkke:

Iceberg and glass-fiber boat support riders on mile-high Berg Lake.

National Geographic, April 1964

(via m-o-o-n-w-h-i-s-p-e-r)

allthingseurope:

Santorini. (by Allard Schager)

illustratosphere:

La musique dans tous ses états by Catherine Rebeyre

"Hangoverium" - Ninio

"Hangoverium" - Ninio

"Light" - Daniele Serra

"Light" - Daniele Serra

Sound Art: Show Review: TREMENDS

I wrote this show review that unfortunately due to some bummer circumstances didn’t run. So I’m running it here. The band is a great Miami band called Tremends who put on a great performance. 
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11.22.13
Guitarist and singer Juan Rozas stuck a crumpled setlist under his pedalboard, while his brother Alejo settled in on the drums and Alex Posada put on her bass. I came to Bardot in Wynwood to see Tremends, a band that had impressed myself and countless others through their very much rocking recorded efforts (rocking in a cool way - hard to come by these days). The Marshall and Ampeg half stacks stood at the ready on a nice Persian rug against the far wall. 
Represented by the local Gummdrops management company, Tremends has been pushing hard to get recognized in the Miami scene. This gig was in fact organized by Gummdrops as part of a triad of shows for their Gummdrops Fall Music Showcase, to host performances at Bardot by some of Miami’s most promising fresh talent. The week before were the mellow songwriters Hunters of the Alps, and the next week would be electronic rockers Shangri-La. 
A minute or two of band discussion later, the high-volume began. From the moment they introduced themselves and kicked into a strong new opener called “Now We Know” (a good portion of the set was new) they sounded like they were here to have fun. 
Juan Rozas’ singing was loud and clear and on key. His understated tone worked perfectly with the band’s style of groove. His voice both fit and added to the music, but the real treats came when he turned away from the mic to concentrate on a guitar line or to jam out with Posada. 
It only kept getting groovier. The next one, “What You Want (Uh Uh Uh Uh)” from their debut Right Time,  started with a deep looping rhythm and kept it going underneath repetitive vocals and more of those delightful guitar melodies and bass-led breakdowns that captured my attention straight away. They only toned it down a few times, the most notable being a chilled out catchy new song “Warm Beside” placed strategically in the middle of the show, featuring Alejo on vocals.
 
Sometimes their sparse jams within songs were reminiscent of Warpaint. Other times they sounded like some more rough around the edges California fare. It made me want to drive through the desert with the windows down, or maybe in a convertible. Adding to this atmosphere was Juan’s tasteful use of effects. He was using light reverb and delay to texture his thoughtfully EQ’d clean tone and not much else, all in the best way possible. The sound of the guitar was clear and punchy, same as the bass. 
The overall sound at Bardot was exceptionally good. It might have been because of how the band uses cleverly applied restraint in their song arrangements, but regardless everything was clear. Guitar, bass lines, vocal harmonies, all had good placement in the mix. The drums were loud and detailed but not overpowering. Perfect. 

"Enigma (blue-green)" - Beau Stanton

"Enigma (blue-green)" - Beau Stanton